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Temporary Changes: Covid-19

Dear Monji Optometry Patients,

We hope you are all doing well and staying healthy. We are open during our regular business hours, please call us at (818) 629-0229 if you need to arrange to pick up glasses or contact lenses. We can also take orders for contact lenses and have them shipped free of charge.

On April 29th the California Optometric Association in conjunction with the California Department of Public Health encouraged Optometrist to resume practicing with new safety measures in place. We are actively taking the appropriate measures to ensure patients and our staff are protected. The steps we are taking include the limiting of patients to one per hour, telehealth, good hygiene, protective barriers, and screening all employees and patients as they enter the office. We are planning on seeing patients on a limited capacity towards the end of May, please call us if you have any urgent vision needs and we will accommodate you.

When visiting the office please wear a mask, we are limiting the number of people in the office so please call us beforehand. Thank you, we hope you are doing well and take care.

Monji Optometry

Our office is located in downtown Burbank across from the Kabuki & Shake Shack restaurants.
Call (818) 629-0229
Book Online

Glaucoma

GlaucomaGlaucoma is a general name for a group of eye diseases that damage the optic nerve of the eye. Glaucoma prevents the eye from sending accurate visual information to the brain.

Usually associated with gradual (and sometimes sudden) increases in pressure within the eyeball itself, glaucoma can result in partial or total blindness over time. The damage caused by glaucoma is irreversible, and it is currently the second-leading cause of blindness in Americans over age 40 in the United States.

Glaucoma Statistics

Currently, glaucoma affects nearly 2.5 million Americans. And while anyone can develop glaucoma, the disease is most common in people over age 40, particularly African Americans. Glaucoma is five times more likely to affect African Americans than Caucasians, and roughly four times more likely to cause blindness.

In addition, people with a family history of glaucoma stand at a higher risk to develop the disease, and anyone over age 60, particularly Mexican Americans, faces an increased risk of glaucoma.

 

Special thanks to the EyeGlass Guide, for informational material that aided in the creation of this website. Visit the EyeGlass Guide today!