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Dear Patients,

We are pleased to inform you that our office is now resuming our regular business hours for appointments. Of utmost importance to us is to continue to provide exceptional eye care in an environment that is safe for our patients and entire Monji Optometry team. We have taken great measures to prepare and implement COVID-19 safety protocols guided by resources from the Center for Disease Control (CDC), the American Optometric Association (AOA) and the California Optometric Association (COA).

We want to share our new safety practices and let you know what you will expect when you come to our office.

  • Our front door will remain locked and only opened to those with appointments. To limit the number of people, all patient encounters will be by appointment, including glasses pickups, adjustments and repairs. Our schedule has been adjusted to allow spacing of people in any given area in our office.
  • We ask that adult patients arrive alone for an appointment. Minor patients may be accompanied by one adult.
  • If you are new to our office, to help us be prepared for your arrival we ask you to submit the “Patient History Form” found on our website under “Patient Forms” before your appointment. Please don’t forget to bring your latest eyeglasses and/or contact lenses.
  • Our staff and patients are required to wear masks. When you arrive, you will be asked COVID-19 screening questions and your temperature will be taken by a non-contact thermometer at the door. If your temperature is over 100 degrees, we will reschedule your appointment.
  • Upon entering, you will be immediately directed to wash your hands. We are practicing safe distancing and ask that you mindfully keep a 6 foot distance between other patients.
  • Plexiglass barrier shields have been placed at our reception desk and tables for eyeglass frame selection to allow safe interaction between you and staff. Protection shields have also been outfitted on examination instruments.
  • Our staff has been trained on CDC procedures to diligently keep touched surfaces, instrumentation and overall office clean and disinfected following each patient and regularly throughout each day. This includes disinfecting eyeglass frames.

We look forward to seeing you soon. Best regards for your continued health and safety!

Monji Optometry

Our office is located in downtown Burbank across from the Kabuki & Shake Shack restaurants.
Call (818) 629-0229
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Home » Eyeglasses & Contacts » Contact Lenses » Bifocal and Multifocal Contact Lenses

Bifocal and Multifocal Contact Lenses

Multifocals

If you are over 40 and have difficulty seeing close up, you probably have a common age-related condition called presbyopia which is when the eye’s natural lens loses the ability to focus on close objects. Presbyopia is a natural process as the eye ages and affects the majority of people from age 40 and upward. Individuals with presbyopia are often familiar with the need to hold reading materials such as newspapers an arm’s length away from their eyes in order to see clearly, yet reading glasses with bifocal or multifocal (progressive) lenses can help.

Fortunately for those who don’t like the look, feel or inconvenience of reading glasses, there is another option. Bifocal and multifocal lenses are also available in contact lenses in both soft and Rigid Gas Permeable (RGP) varieties.

Multifocal contact lenses give you added freedom over glasses and they allow you to be able to view any direction – up, down and to the sides – with a similar vision. People wearing progressive lenses in glasses, on the other hand, have to look over their glasses if they want to view upwards or into the distance.

The Difference Between Bifocal and Multifocal Lenses

Just as the name indicates, bifocal lenses are divided into two distinct segments for different vision powers, the first for distance vision and the second for near vision. This enables you to clearly switch your focus from near to far as needed, but your vision will not necessarily be clear in between. The term multifocal lenses can refer to any lenses with multiple powers including bifocals, trifocals or progressive lenses. Non-bifocal multifocal lenses have a range of powers that enable you to constantly adjust your focus to see clearly from up close to far and in between.

Multifocal contact lenses are generally designed in one of two ways, as either simultaneous vision lenses or alternating vision lenses.

Simultaneous vision lenses

The most popular version of multifocal contact lenses, simultaneous vision lenses present the distance and near vision zones of the lens at the same time. Typically after a short adjustment period, your eyes learn to utilize the segment of the lens that they need to focus on the desired object and essentially ignore the other.

They come in two designs:

  • Concentric ring design: In the most basic form these are bifocal lenses that are comprised of a central circular area of one power with a ring around of the alternate power, similar to a bulls-eye. In this design the power of the rings (either near or distance vision is interchangeable). For intermediate viewing (18-24 inches away) extra rings can be added to create a trifocal or multifocal lens. The width of each ring is variable depending on the power that is needed most and the edges of the rings can be blended for a smooth transition of focus, similar to progressive eyeglass lenses.
  • Aspheric design: These multifocal lenses attempt to provide a natural vision experience by blending many lens powers across the surface and center of the lens. In this design both distance and near vision power are located in the central visual area and your eyes will adapt to focus on the area needed to view what you are looking at.

Translating or Alternating Vision lenses

Similar to bifocal eyeglass lenses, these contacts are divided into distinct areas or zones and your pupil will move to the desired zone depending on your vision needs. Typically the top of the lens, which is what you look through when looking straight ahead is for distance vision and the bottom area (what you look through when you look down) is for near vision. However, this can be reversed according to unique vision needs.

Since contact lenses sometimes move within your eye, translating lenses are held in place by a ballast which is an area that is thicker than the rest of the lens or by truncating or flattening the bottom to stay in line by the lower lid. These lenses are only available in rigid gas permeable lens material.

An Alternative Option to Multifocal Contact Lenses: Monovision

Monovision is another contact lens alternative for presbyopia particularly if you are having

difficulty adapting to multifocal lenses. Monovision splits your distance and near vision between your eyes, using your dominant eye for distance vision and your non-dominant eye for near vision.

Typically you will use single vision lenses in each eye however, sometimes the dominant eye will use a single vision lens while a multifocal lens will be used in the other eye for intermediate and near vision. This is called modified monovision. Your eye doctor will perform a test to determine which type of lens is best suited for each eye and optimal vision.

Are Contact Lenses Right for You?

If you have presbyopia, contact lenses may be a great option for you. Many people prefer the look and convenience of contact lenses over traditional reading glasses. Speak to your eye doctor about the options available to you.