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Dear Patients,

We are pleased to inform you that our office is now resuming our regular business hours for appointments. Of utmost importance to us is to continue to provide exceptional eye care in an environment that is safe for our patients and entire Monji Optometry team. We have taken great measures to prepare and implement COVID-19 safety protocols guided by resources from the Center for Disease Control (CDC), the American Optometric Association (AOA) and the California Optometric Association (COA).

We want to share our new safety practices and let you know what you will expect when you come to our office.

  • Our front door will remain locked and only opened to those with appointments. To limit the number of people, all patient encounters will be by appointment, including glasses pickups, adjustments and repairs. Our schedule has been adjusted to allow spacing of people in any given area in our office.
  • We ask that adult patients arrive alone for an appointment. Minor patients may be accompanied by one adult.
  • If you are new to our office, to help us be prepared for your arrival we ask you to submit the “Patient History Form” found on our website under “Patient Forms” before your appointment. Please don’t forget to bring your latest eyeglasses and/or contact lenses.
  • Our staff and patients are required to wear masks. When you arrive, you will be asked COVID-19 screening questions and your temperature will be taken by a non-contact thermometer at the door. If your temperature is over 100 degrees, we will reschedule your appointment.
  • Upon entering, you will be immediately directed to wash your hands. We are practicing safe distancing and ask that you mindfully keep a 6 foot distance between other patients.
  • Plexiglass barrier shields have been placed at our reception desk and tables for eyeglass frame selection to allow safe interaction between you and staff. Protection shields have also been outfitted on examination instruments.
  • Our staff has been trained on CDC procedures to diligently keep touched surfaces, instrumentation and overall office clean and disinfected following each patient and regularly throughout each day. This includes disinfecting eyeglass frames.

We look forward to seeing you soon. Best regards for your continued health and safety!

Monji Optometry

Our office is located in downtown Burbank across from the Kabuki & Shake Shack restaurants.
Call (818) 629-0229
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Home » What's New » Does Smoking Affect Vision?

Does Smoking Affect Vision?

Eye Doctors Weigh In: How Smoking Can Harm Your Vision & Eye Health

We all know that smoking is bad for you, especially the risks that it poses to your heart and lungs. What many people do not know is that cigarette smoke negatively affects your eyes and vision too. Smoking has been directly linked to an increase in the risks of both cataracts and macular degeneration, two leading causes of vision loss, and it is believed to be a factor in a number of other eye and vision issues. 

Smoking and Cataracts

Studies show that smoking doubles the risk of cataracts and with heavy smoking, the risk triples. In fact, there seems to be a direct correlation between the amount of smoking and the likelihood of cataracts. Cataracts are characterised by the clouding of the lens of the eye and it is believed that smoking affects the cells of the lens, accelerating this process. 

Cataracts are a leading cause of vision loss worldwide, however they can be treated surgically by removing the clouded lens and replacing it with an artificial one. Symptoms include: 

    • Blurred, cloudy or dim vision 
    • Sensitivity to light and glare
    • Presence of halos around lights
    • Increasingly poor night vision
    • Fading color vision
    • Double vision
    • and frequent prescription changes with minimal improvement in vision 

Smoking and Age-Related Macular Degeneration

According to medical research, smoking increases the likelihood of developing age-related macular degeneration between two and four times the normal risk - the more you smoke, the greater the risk. Unfortunately, there is also an increased risk for those exposed to cigarette smoke for extended periods of time. 

Age-related macular degeneration or AMD is a condition in which the macula, which is the center of the retina, begins to to deteriorate, reducing central vision and the eye’s ability to see fine details. The disease is characterized by blurred and distorted eyesight and blind spots in the central vision. With time, the disease can progress to leave the person with low vision, which is significant vision loss that cannot be corrected by eyeglasses, contact lenses or refractive surgery. 

Other Eye and Vision Risks of Smoking

Smoking has also been linked to dry eyes, optic nerve damage and diabetic retinopathy (for those with diabetes). 

"Eye Vitamins" are often used without doctor's recommendations. Smokers are cautioned not to take beta-carotene supplements, specifically, (or multi-vitamins containing this ingredient) as studies indicate there is increased risk of cancer even in people who quit smoking.

What to Do?

Even if you have been smoking for years, quitting will reduce the risks of developing these conditions, for yourself and those around you. If you do smoke, make sure to schedule a comprehensive eye exam every year to catch any developing disease early. Early diagnosis and treatment can be the key to saving your vision and preventing permanent vision loss.